Einstein Injury Analysis Report Podcast: Week 3 Player Commentary

Posted by Christine Skiffington on Sep 23, 2016 11:27:06 AM

Einstein's own sports medicine expert Brett Sweitzer, MD, joins Ike Reese on Sportsradio 94WIP this week to discuss the most important injuries of interest to Philadelphia football fans. Going into week three of the season, Dr. Sweitzer weighs in on the possible consequences of Michael Kendricks's broken nose and kicker Caleb Sturgis's cramping. Plus, he discusses how suspended players, like Lane Johnson, can keep up their fitness level without even practicing with the team. 

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Topics: Sports Medicine

Infographic: 5 Tips for a Better Night’s Sleep

Posted by Christine Skiffington on Sep 21, 2016 10:20:00 PM

Sleep is vital to your health and a critical part of life. You need it to recharge your brain and body for another day.

Stress, everyday demands, and even your smartphone are some of the culprits affecting your sleep.

To sleep better and wake up feeling more rested, follow this advice:

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Topics: Fitness

The Emotional Response to Terror: 6 Ways of Coping

Posted by Angela Cantwell, MSN on Sep 21, 2016 1:21:17 PM

In light of the terror attacks that have recently occurred, Angela Cantwell, MSN, clinical director for Nursing for Behavioral Health for Einstein Healthcare Network, offers these tips for staying calm and moving forward: 

It’s natural for people to feel afraid, outraged, sad, helpless, guilty, or insecure immediately following a traumatic event such as a terrorist attack.

People may have an emotional response that’s accompanied by physical responses, such as an upset stomach, feeling like you may cry at any moment, feeling nervous, having a rapid heart rate or breathing, or feeling dizzy or faint.  

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Topics: Behavioral Health

Video: 6 Tips to Prevent Kidney Stones

Posted by Monyee Liang on Sep 21, 2016 11:04:37 AM

One out of every 11 Americans will experience kidney stones. This often painful condition has a number of causes, including a genetic predisposition, and abnormalities in metabolism and anatomy.

It isn't always possible to prevent kidney stones, but all the same, many of us can reduce the odds.

Here are six ways to do just that (Video by Monyee Liang).

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Topics: Kidney Stones

Blindness Hasn't Robbed Accomplished Sculptor of Her Creative Vision

Posted by Denise Foley on Sep 20, 2016 1:40:13 PM

The first thing you notice about Betsy Clayton’s house in Dresher are the gardens. Even in the midst of an August heat wave, they’re lush with blooms: golden black-eyed Susans, dancing pink cleomes and purple loosestrife, and a spectacular white tree hydrangea thick with immense cone-shaped flower heads. She does it all herself, though a teenaged grandson helps with some of the harder chores, like pruning.

The garden extends from the front to the back of her house in Philadelphia’s Montgomery County suburbs, where it’s framed by a wall of windows in her family room like an immense mural—a mural she can’t see.

At the age of 30, with eight children, Clayton learned that she was going blind. She has a genetic, early-onset form of macular degeneration, an incurable eye disease that leads to the deterioration of the macula, a small, central part of the retina that controls visual sharpness in the center of the eye. She still has some peripheral vision, but the disease has already robbed her sister, Carol Saylor, of most of her sight.

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Topics: All About Art

Victor Center for the Prevention of Jewish Genetic Diseases Advises: Get Your Inside Story

Posted by Jeff Meade on Sep 20, 2016 10:40:46 AM

Screening for Tay-Sachs—a fatal neurological disease affecting young children—has been widely embraced within the Jewish community for decades and is regarded as one of the true success stories in the field of genetic testing.

While Tay-Sachs is by far the best known of Jewish genetic disorders, it is far from the only one.

That’s why the Einstein Victor Center for the Prevention of Jewish Genetic Diseases strongly recommends that couples of Jewish heritage get screened to determine whether they are carriers for diseases with a high prevalence within the Jewish community. (Carriers are people who have one copy of a mutated gene that could be passed along to their children. People who are carriers do not have the actual disease.)

Among the specific Jewish genetic diseases the Victor Center screens for is Gaucher Disease, a metabolic enzyme deficiency with a carrier rate of 1 in 200 in the general population, but up to 1 in 10 to 15 among Ashkenazi Jews (Jews of Eastern European descent). Another example is Fanconi Anemia, an inherited bone marrow disorder with a carrier rate of 1 in 300 in the general population, but about 1 in 100 among Ashkenazi Jews.

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Topics: Victor Center

Infographic: Sit Less and Live Longer

Posted by Christine Skiffington on Sep 19, 2016 2:01:02 PM

The human body is made to move. Why else would we have 640 muscles? But many people spend much of their days sedentary (up to eight or nine hours of sitting).

A sedentary lifestyle can double your risk of developing diabetes and increase your risk for heart disease, obesity, and cancer.

Too much sitting can even decrease your life expectancy by up to two years.

Use the tips in this infographic to fit more activity into your busy day.

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Topics: Fitness

Einstein Injury Analysis Report Podcast: Week 2 Player Commentary

Posted by Christine Skiffington on Sep 16, 2016 3:42:14 PM

Einstein's own sports medicine expert Rosemarie Boehm, MD, joins Ike Reese on Sportsradio 94WIP this week to discuss the most important injuries of interest to Philadelphia football fans. Going into week two of the season, Dr. Boehm weighs in on the possible consequences of Zach Ertz's rib displacement and Leodis McKelvin's pulled hamstring.

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Topics: Sports Medicine

Infographic: 10 Reasons To Start Running Now

Posted by Christine Skiffington on Sep 15, 2016 10:30:00 AM

More than 18 million U.S. adults crossed the finish line of a running race last year, according to industry group Running USA.

Even if you never pin on a race bib, lacing up and stepping out can have big benefits for body and mind.

Here are 10 research-proven benefits of running.

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Topics: Running, Fitness, Infographics

Cast Your Vote for the Alice and Herbert Sachs Therapeutic Conservatory and Garden!

Posted by Perspectives Blog Team on Sep 14, 2016 2:59:41 PM

A garden can be a place of beauty and contentment for anyone who visits.

The Alice and Herbert Sachs Therapeutic Conservatory and Garden at MossRehab is one such place—but it's so much more. The Conservatory and Garden is dedicated to helping patients who are recovering from stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury and other conditions add a new and powerful dimension to their rehabilitation.

Named in honor of the project's benefactors, the Conservatory and Garden helps patients advance their rehabilitation through gardening activities in a bright and airy greenhouse. The Conservatory features three distinct work, grow and show areas, as well as an outdoor patio.

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Topics: MossRehab

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About this blog

Perspectives highlights the expertise and services provided by the physicians, specialists, nurses and other healthcare providers at Einstein Healthcare Network. Through this blog, we share information about new treatments and technologies, top-tier clinical teams and the day-to-day interactions that reinforce our commitment to delivering quality care with compassion. Here, you will also find practical advice for championing your health and wellness.

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